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Guidelines for Writing "élan Trends" Articles

on 25 August 2010 - 3:58pm

(last updated on Aug 25, 2010)

 

élan Trends is continually updted, news-in-context publication with a quarterly summary issue. What follows here is not a rule set but as the title says, guidelines. They are not to limit your creative expression but to give it a shared framework that can enhance it and, at the same time, establish an "élan Trends" style.

 

•    Start with a news, a document, a video or a website that you've just come across about something that moves the edge of evolution in a domain of human endeavor that élan monitors and you care about. They are listed on the "Frontiers We Monitor" page. You can also your compilation of extracts from various sources blended together in a common theme refrred to by the title of your article.

 

•    If what you've chosen is a website or a longish document, select its most representative paragraphs that you can build on illuminating its "élan" value.

 

•    Write a context-setting introduction of no more than 5-6 paragraphs, organized into the four parts that follow.

 

1.    Start with a "human interest" lead-in, something about the author(s) of the original document or the person/people featured in the news that you quote. This section is not only to engage the interest of the readers but also to create a link to/with the people we write about. Movement journalism is both to inform, and help weaving a web of co-creative connections.

 

2.    Set the piece in context: tell briefly about why you've picked this story, why should the reader care, what is edgy about it. Writing that, think about what may expand the readers' horizon/perspective on what is happening in the domain of action that you'll tag your story with.

 

3.    If you feel inspired, expand a bit on the above by giving a few sentence analysis that will further whet the readers appetite and situate the story in the context of planetary Emergence.

 

4.    Encourage/inspire action, some easy-to-make steps that the reader can make if s/he wants to get involved with the subject being.

 

•    If what you report on is text, include a visual from the source of the news. If you can't find an image there worth picking up, create or hunt for a visual on the web, which can enhance your message.

 

•    Don't forget referencing, at the end of the story, the original author, URL and the date when it was retrieved.

 

•    For a sample "élan Trends" story look up this.
 

Glistening Deepwater's picture

I have noted that I tend to focus on initiatives which are open-source and presented in a multi-user or wiki style format. The cutting edge of practice seems to be emerging in these ways and there is often not a particular 'person' responsible for the content of these invaluable developmental sharing and learning expeditions. Also, it seems that I prefer to focus on the topic rather than the personalities. Does this present a potential problem that anyone can forsee before I go ablout producing articles for inclusion here?

George Pór's picture

> I have noted that I tend to focus on initiatives which are open-source and presented in a multi-user or wiki style format.

 

That's good.

 

> The cutting edge of practice seems to be emerging in these ways and there is often not a particular 'person' responsible for the content of these invaluable developmental sharing and learning expeditions.

 

Sure.

 

> Also, it seems that I prefer to focus on the topic rather than the personalities. Does this present a potential problem that anyone can forsee before I go ablout producing articles for inclusion here?

 

Not at all. The mentioning by name of any people involved with the project you write about serves only giving them more support and the weaving the web of a potentially co-creative relationship with them.